Hometown U

Hometown U represents the University of Alaska Anchorage. We are a diverse and inclusive public university serving 20,000 students in Anchorage and four community campuses. Our mission is to discover and disseminate knowledge through teaching, research, engagement and creative expression.

Here you'll be alerted to enriching opportunities for engaging your mind and heart. What are our scientists working on? Our playwrights and poets? What's student life like? Get perspective on Alaska and global complexities through the eyes of those who study them carefully.

Find our website here. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

We invite you to explore this great university, located right in your own backyard.

Contact Kathleen McCoy at kmccoy5@uaa.alaska.edu

What makes a cold city cool? Investigating urban design - 3/24/2014 3:26 pm

Student Spotlight: Seawolf Debate Program - 3/18/2014 10:23 am

Reimagining a winter campus during Winterfest 2014 - 2/24/2014 10:29 am

Bringing the tables of Istanbul to the screen - 2/18/2014 10:27 am

A dedicated space for alumni, UAA’s new Alumni Center - 2/12/2014 4:08 pm

Living history: Tuskegee aviator visits UAA - 2/7/2014 9:19 am

UAA offers Alaska Native words of welcome - 1/15/2014 5:05 pm

UAA joins community and statewide relief efforts for typhoon-ravaged Philippines - 11/20/2013 10:36 am

Summer is research season at UAA

Toolik Lake Field Notes: This research site is used by scientists from around the world doing arctic work. This UAA science blog tells stories about some of the research there.Toolik Lake Field Notes: This research site is used by scientists from around the world doing arctic work. This UAA science blog tells stories about some of the research there.Writer Jamie Gonzales enjoyed the rare opportunity to visit Toolik Lake Field Station in early June. She accompanied a UAA team researching the circadian rhythm cycles of arctic ground squirrels.

Team Squirrel: Brian Barnes, Loren Buck and Cory Williams, co-principal investigators on Team Squirrel.Team Squirrel: Brian Barnes, Loren Buck and Cory Williams, co-principal investigators on Team Squirrel.

Her reports make for an engaging glimpse into the serious work at Toolik, told with an eye toward the curious armchair scientist in us all. Find her posts here, at Field Notes: A trip to the Arctic with Team Squirrel.

A sample:

Here’s what I’ve learned in just four days of Arctic tromping and sharing close quarters with scientists from around the world studying the science of the Arctic:

An arctic ground squirrel only needs to breathe about once a minute during hibernation;
Ground squirrels also don’t have the same tissue-damaging inflammatory response to injury that humans experience, so they can snap back from a brain injury or an extended heart stoppage;
An arctic bumblebee can thermoregulate, warming itself internally to temperatures comparable to what you and I enjoy as mammals;
Deep in the tundra permafrost are captive molecules of carbon that are hundreds, maybe thousands of years old, but shifting temperatures are causing some permafrost to thaw, releasing that ancient carbon back into the air;
There is a caterpillar here in the Arctic that, if conditions are not right for metamorphosis into a moth, can remain in that pupa stage for up to 14 years;
And when bears hibernate, they don’t lose any bone or muscle mass—it’s almost like they’re hitting the gym every day, even though they’re curled up in their dens.

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Enjoy our photoblog, Northern Exposures

UAA's Northern Exposures: UAA has launched a photo blog to feature life and events at UAA. Come join us!UAA's Northern Exposures: UAA has launched a photo blog to feature life and events at UAA. Come join us!

Follow campus design progress at our Master Plan 2013 blog
UAA Master Plan Blog 2013UAA Master Plan Blog 2013

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