Hometown U

Hometown U represents the University of Alaska Anchorage. We are a diverse and inclusive public university serving 20,000 students in Anchorage and four community campuses. Our mission is to discover and disseminate knowledge through teaching, research, engagement and creative expression.

Here you'll be alerted to enriching opportunities for engaging your mind and heart. What are our scientists working on? Our playwrights and poets? What's student life like? Get perspective on Alaska and global complexities through the eyes of those who study them carefully.

Find our website here. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

We invite you to explore this great university, located right in your own backyard.

Contact Kathleen McCoy at kmccoy5@uaa.alaska.edu

What makes a cold city cool? Investigating urban design - 3/24/2014 3:26 pm

Student Spotlight: Seawolf Debate Program - 3/18/2014 10:23 am

Reimagining a winter campus during Winterfest 2014 - 2/24/2014 10:29 am

Bringing the tables of Istanbul to the screen - 2/18/2014 10:27 am

A dedicated space for alumni, UAA’s new Alumni Center - 2/12/2014 4:08 pm

Living history: Tuskegee aviator visits UAA - 2/7/2014 9:19 am

UAA offers Alaska Native words of welcome - 1/15/2014 5:05 pm

UAA joins community and statewide relief efforts for typhoon-ravaged Philippines - 11/20/2013 10:36 am

Scott Goldsmith on 'Maximum Sustainable Yield: FY 2014 Update'

Alaska's state government can afford to spend about $5.5 billion in fiscal year 2014 (July 2013 to June 2014). That's the most recent estimate of the level of General Fund spending the state can sustain over the long run, from a ISER Research Matters: An effort to quickly let Alaskans know about research findings from the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER), at the University of Alaska Anchorage.ISER Research Matters: An effort to quickly let Alaskans know about research findings from the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER), at the University of Alaska Anchorage.new paper by Scott Goldsmith, professor emeritus of economics at ISER. The $5.5 billion figure is based on the state's current petroleum nest egg of about $149 billion.

That nest egg is a combination of $60 billion in state financial assets (the Permanent Fund and cash reserves) and the estimated $89 billion value of petroleum still in the ground. The size of the nest egg fluctuates, depending on the state's forecast of petroleum revenues, earnings on investment, and other factors. If the state over-spends, it could face a severe fiscal and economic crisis after 2023, even if it adds revenues from natural gas production and new oil production.

But the paper also finds that the state in fact over-spent in recent years, putting it on the path to major fiscal and economic problems in the years ahead. Still, the state can get back on track by saving much more and restricting the rate of spending growth. The paper estimates that if the state could double its financial assets by 2023—from $60 billion today to $117 billion—it would be on the path to sustainable spending far into the future.

Download a PDF copy of the paper, "Maximum Sustainable Yield: FY 2014 Update."

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UAA's Northern Exposures: UAA has launched a photo blog to feature life and events at UAA. Come join us!UAA's Northern Exposures: UAA has launched a photo blog to feature life and events at UAA. Come join us!

Follow campus design progress at our Master Plan 2012 blog
UAA Master Plan Blog 2012: UAA is updating its campus plan, with a new master plan expected in the spring. Follow the progress on this blog.UAA Master Plan Blog 2012: UAA is updating its campus plan, with a new master plan expected in the spring. Follow the progress on this blog.

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